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Pot Ale Syrup


 DM ME
CP
Starch
Oil
 45.0%  14.0  37.0%  1.3%  1.0%

Description

Pot ale syrup is the evaporated co-product from the first distillation stage in the production of malt whisky.  It comprises a rich blend of proteins, carbohydrates and yeast residues which provide a highly palatable and nutritious feed for all class of cattle.

Nutrient Value (Analysis on DM basis)

Dry Matter 45.0%
Crude Protein
37.0%
Oil (B) 1.0%
Starch 1.3%
Sugars 2.0%
 Fibre          <1.0%
ME(MJ/kg) 14.0

Bulk Density 830 litres/T

Ingredients (Descending order of inclusion)

  • Malting Barley

    Nutritional Attributes

    Pot Ale Syrup is a golden brown liquid with a sweet malty aroma. Pot Ale Syrup is a highly palatable liquid feed with a high level of protein and energy which is ideally suited to beef and dairy cattle. It should be noted that advice should be sought before feeding Pot Ale Syrup to sheep. The product is high in Potassium which may cause scouring when fed at high levels.

    Storage and Handling

    Pot Ale Syrup is a free flowing liquid that is easy to handle. The product should be stored in a 25 to 30 tonne tank with appropriate pipe work to allow the delivery and dispatch of the product on farm. The product is acidic so stores well.  

    Inclusion Rates

    Up to 20% in dairy and beef diets

     

    Dairy
    Up to a max.  of 3kg  per hd/day depending on the total diet status.
    Beef
    Up to a max. of 2kg per hd/day.
    Sheep
    Extreme care should be taken when feeding to sheep due to high copper levels especially to breeds susceptible to copper toxicity.

     

    All products supplied by Feeds Marketing should be used in diets under the advice and recommendation of qualified personnel.

    All information, data, recommendations and advice given, or supplied by BOCM PAULS, or its employees, is in good faith on the basis of information supplied to BOCM PAULS and prepared in light of circumstances prevailing at the time they are given.

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